Questions for November 2016

All pictures again – some from my holidays!!


On this map of Europe, what do the coloured zones represent?


Where is this?


This is Archbishop Grgur, a propellerhead of the 10th century. As you can see, he was pretty motivated – what about?


This is the ancient town of Komiza, on the Dalmatian island of Vis. A passing Pope with his fleet of boats took shelter here during a storm – this was ages ago – and was impressed with the industry and zeal of the fishermen, as well as their hospitality. How did that Pope reward the fishermen of Komiza?


This is an 18th-century lawyer in London, depicted at one moment in his life. (The artist must have sketched very quickly). What is about to happen?

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5 comments

  1. Dr Bob’s answers –

    1. Map of Europe – Bees. Types of Bee, showing (because the map was in Slovenia) that Slovenian bees are better than the other sorts.

    2. Where is this – inscription – it’s in Glagolitic. Apart from Saga Norén in //The Bridge// doesn’t anyone recognise Glagolitic any more? It is the biggest and most famous public inscription in that language and, as Wikipedia will tell you, it’s on an interior wall of Zagreb Cathedral.

    3. Archbishop Grgur – what a guy! He insisted on preaching in the local language instead of in Latin, which his congregation could not understand. This got him into all sorts of strife with the Church. The Pope said, “Grrrrr…”

    4. The Pope granted to the hapless fishermen of Komiza who rescued him: Permission to fish on Sundays. Handy when the weather was bad except on a Sunday, but they lost their only day off.

    5. Arthur Beardmore, a troublesome 18th-century lawyer, is pointing out a clause in the Magna Carta to his son, while the police are knocking his house door down in order to arrest him.

  2. 1. “Who do you think you are fooling Mr Hitler if you think old England’s done? We are the boys who will stop your little game….”

    2.It’s in *^#&*&$#*&* (which is about 5 minutes down the road from (*)%^#*(#*#@.

    3. Spin on this “President Trump” !

    4. If the local Turks decided to convert he wouldn’t have them all massacred on the spot as was standard practice at the time. Mr Nice Guy or what?

    5. That’s me sonny (the archetypal low-life lawyer) crawling under a snake’s belly whilst wearing a top hat.

  3. 1. The coloured zones look like some kind of genetic prevalence map. But why is the seagull trying to swallow the Black Sea?
    2. As part of the Council of Nicea, a number of symbols were proposed to represent Christianity. This is the record of some of the votes.
    3. 10th century? The end of the world is nigh?
    4. Indulgences, 20% off if you act now.
    5. a) Latin for ‘this will hurt you more than it will hurt me’
    b) After ten minutes of intensive reading, you must take a break. Your ergonomic exercise this time is to turn your head – no not that way.
    c) Sorry son, but I can’t find Wally either.
    d) If you keep practicising reading, one day your book will be as big as mine.

  4. 1. I can see Po Land so I suppose the rest are Tinky-Winky Land, Dipsy Land and Laa-Laa Land.

    2. It is the wallpaper on my Nazarene PC.

    3. Motivated by sculpture. His style was adopted by Alberto Giacometti and his “The Pointing Man” went for $140 mill spondooliks.

    4. He introduced them to the newest engineering device and the latest thing in men’s fashion: The Split Pin and the Cravat.

    5. The first pictorial evidence of the universal “Pull my Finger” joke.

  5. 1. On this map of Europe, what do the coloured zones represent?

    A. When I first read this question, I thought I was only to look at the purple countries. They look like a hedgehog, so all I can think of as an answer is to say the purple countries are hedgehog friendly zones. As for the real answer, i’m not sure. Are they countries who have played host to King Zog?

    2. Where is this?
    A. In a book.

    3. This is Archbishop Grgur, a propellerhead of the 10th century. As you can see, he was pretty motivated – what about?
    A. That looks like me when I’m about to go all old skool and say ‘Word’. But he’s 10th century and an archbish, so I suspect it’s more like some kind of fight with the church/Pope of that time. It was all the rage back then.

    4. This is the ancient town of Komiza, on the Dalmatian island of Vis. A passing Pope with his fleet of boats took shelter here during a storm – this was ages ago – and was impressed with the industry and zeal of the fishermen, as well as their hospitality. How did that Pope reward the fishermen of Komiza?
    A. Being the Pope (again with the religion, Dr Bob!) it’ll be something useless. I’m going to google this one. It looks like he gave them a church. Good one, Pope! How is that going to help the fishing?

    5. This is an 18th-century lawyer in London, depicted at one moment in his life. (The artist must have sketched very quickly). What is about to happen?
    A. No idea who the man is, but I tried googling the words he is pointing to. i think it is William Garrow who basically masterminded the adversarial court system–all men are innocent until proven guilty. And from that came that reliable British industry of tv crime shows where the person who seems the most innocent and helpful at the start turns out to be the guilty party.

    Sorry, Dr Bob. A bit of a half-arsed contribution this time. I am going to be very interested to find out who No. 5 is and what his caper was.

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