Questions for July/August 2014

Sorry for the delay, I was cycling in Estonia … yes, really. Excuses like this, 10c each. Good excuses, 50c, but we’ve sold out. Here at last are the questions for July/August … PLEASE HAVE A GO – by posting a comment, preferably sarcastic – as I know the answers anyway; I’ll put the real answers up in early September.

  1. The 2006 film version of Macbeth is, of course, yet another Australian contribution to world culture. At the end of the film, what is unusual about the titles and credits?
  2. If all the numbers were written as words in alphabetical order, EIGHT would be the first entry; what would the last entry be?
  3. The government of Lesotho is one of two in the world that has an upper chamber whose members are not elected; what is the other such government?
  4. In Rembrandt’s famous painting The Anatomy Lesson, all the characters except one have a very stiff, formal demeanour. Only one of the characters looks relaxed – which one?
  5. Orson Welles once played Captain Ahab on the stage – what went wrong, and how did Kenneth Tynan link this to Hamlet?
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10 comments

  1. 1. The subtitles scroll downwards, because, like, everything in Australia is upside down

    2. ZERO

    3. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northen Ireland

    4. The cadaver itself

    5. Welles’ false nose came loose – so Kenneth Tynan wrote: whereas Hamlet is a play about a man who cannot make up his mind, this is a play about a man who cannot make up his nose.

  2. Guessing like mad:
    1. They don’t go on for ages and ages listing obscure theatrical titles like “assistant best gaffer support”. Alternatively, do they list the cast in reverse order of appearance?

    2. Zero point zero zero zero … zero two.

    3. The House of Lords in the UK.

    4. The corpse?

    5. IHTFI 😦

  3. 2. Of course Bob by “numbers” you mean “non-negative” integers, don’t you? “Zero” is too obvious an answer, so gotta look beyond it. Hmmm “All the numbers”. Aha! Not possible to write “all” the numbers! Unless you want to go with something like “Zillion Zillion Zillion …” (etc, ad nauseum).

    4. Had a look at that painting and it is really scary. Firstly, the people in it are not only all looking in different directions, but seemingly at different things. You couldn’t do a “spot the ball” competition out of this one. It’s almost as if he got the people to pose afterwards and then painted them in, like a collage. Secondly, and especially seeing as it’s Rembrandt, the perspective isn’t quite right. Especially the background, which seems to be suffering from gross spherical abberation.

  4. The belief that most Australians understand 1337 is a load of bull $#!+.

  5. 2. The Yami dialect, spoken in Taiwan, pronounces ten as “poo”. I would have thought that this would be number two.

  6. 1. They require the ability to speak 1337
    2. “zero” is the answer that comes to mind
    3. If the house of lords still unrepresentative swill (thank you P Keating), I’ll say the UK.
    4. Probably the dead guy
    5.What went wrong? Orson Welles played Captain Ahab. Link to Hamlet? Welles impulsiveness causes death and destruction, like Hamlet.

  7. 1. Appropriately for something from down under, they go from bottom to top. And it must be the only version of Macbeth with a Holden in it.

    2. Zero of course

    3. While the Australian Senate is merely “unrepresentative swill” – the House of Lords is unelected swill.

    4.The body being dissected – a bit like Midsomer Murders actually.

    5. The harpooner confused Orson Wells with the whale and harpooned him…

  8. 1. The Director stored them in a tent where they were promptly stolen by a dingo.
    2. The Brake Number, close relative to the Drake. It can go from Twenty to Zero in a nanosecond.
    3. Lordie, lordie lordie got no idea. Those elevated to the House of Gryfindor, Ravenclaw, Hufflepuff or Slytherin were not elected, but that’s old hat.
    4. It is not widely known that Rembrandt’s particular choice of pigments, oils and charcoals combined to render him impotent in his later years.
    An even lesser known fact is that his main squeeze, Saskia van Rijn was so disenamoured by this, she developed the world’s first aphrodisiac that would guarantee some hot action under the matrimonial covers.. Marketed as “The Dutch Oven” it failed to catch on.
    The Master’s models, however, sometimes used her concoction for recreational purposes. In the painting, the stiff ones have used her potion while one bloke opted out.
    Or I could be dead wrong.
    5. Just the sight of Orson Wells, Captain Ahab, Kenneth Tynan and Hamlet in the same sentence caused me to reach for my medication.
    Dr Bob, once again, you are not the Messiah…

  9. 1) The 2006 film version of Macbeth is, of course, yet another Australian contribution to world culture. At the end of the film, what is unusual about the titles and credits?

    They saved money by not having any. Shakespeare is very boring and the audience would have been asleep by then anyway.

    2) If all the numbers were written as words in alphabetical order, EIGHT would be the first entry; what would the last entry be?

    A null ! T+W+O+NULL+NULL (character 5)

    3) The government of Lesotho is one of two in the world that has an upper chamber whose members are not elected; what is the other such government?

    Australia of course. No-one in their right mind (or even their wrong one) can believe our Mickey Mouse preferential voting system is the remotest bit democratic.

    4) In Rembrandt’s famous painting The Anatomy Lesson, all the characters except one have a very stiff, formal demeanour. Only one of the characters looks relaxed – which one?

    Get it right this time guys. First you anaesthetise the patient, THEN you do the incision!

    5) Orson Welles once played Captain Ahab on the stage – what went wrong, and how did Kenneth Tynan link this to Hamlet?

    It’s Weight Watchers for you Orson mate. This stage can’t support two white whales!

  10. 1.The 2006 film version of Macbeth is, of course, yet another Australian contribution to world culture. At the end of the film, what is unusual about the titles and credits?
    A1. The background illustration is of a comely Aussie wench who is up the macduff.

    2.If all the numbers were written as words in alphabetical order, EIGHT would be the first entry; what would the last entry be?
    A2. Tch, Dr Bob, be specific. Which alphabet?

    3.The government of Lesotho is one of two in the world that has an upper chamber whose members are not elected; what is the other such government?
    A3. More than two, Dr Bob. The Poms don’t elect their upper house, but neither does Queensland. Qld does not have an upper house, therefore it must also be unelected. Or something.

    4.In Rembrandt’s famous painting The Anatomy Lesson, all the characters except one have a very stiff, formal demeanour. Only one of the characters looks relaxed – which one?
    A4. The stiff.

    5.Orson Welles once played Captain Ahab on the stage – what went wrong, and how did Kenneth Tynan link this to Hamlet?
    A5. The theatre audience could not tell the difference between Orson Welles and the whale, which led Kenneth Tynan in the audience to opine, in a stage whisper, “O, that that too too solid flesh would melt.”

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